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Exploiting films

 

Inspired by a session given by Mark Reid of the British Film Institute during the highly successful event held by L'Institut français to celebrate La journée mondiale de la francophonie, we decided to dedicate a section of the site to sharing resources and ideas relating to 'the moving image'.  

 

As well as film, there are references to TV and home-made creations!  

 

We'll try to keep lists alphabetical and acknowledge sources by initials of contributors to the forum.

 

Films & tasks

    French

    German

 

Ideas / overviews / pedagogy

    links

    notes

 

Films & Tasks

 

TOPICS could include: Accident |Accommodation | Alphabet | Bank |Classroom language incl exam rubrics |Colours |Countries |Culture / Festival | Currency | Dates | Eating | Entertainment | Environmental & social issues ||Finding the way |Food & Drink incl café and restaurant| Health services (incl Chemist, doctor) | Healthy living | Hiring |Holidays | Home (description) | Home life incl helping at home and daily routine | ICT | Leisure & interests incl meeting arrangements, media | Letter writing |Local environment incl describe home town | Lost property | Numbers | Opinions | Post Office | School | Self, family & friends incl pets | Shopping | Telephone | Time | Tourism | Travel & transport |Weather & climate | Work & careers incl money, pocket money, part-time jobs, work experience

GRAMMAR could be anything!

French

 

Title / Source with embedded link Topic Notes
General links
Allo-ciné   great for the film trailers and for the film critiques. I 've always had my advanced students to write film critiques but this year I had them to actually post them to the Allociné site. Not surprisingly, posting these critiques to Allociné produced a much higher quality of work than just a simple paper and pencil exercise. We did, however, do all of our drafting and editing in class. (AH)
Espace francophone    video clips with study guides from Louisiana (AH)
Clips from Louisiana site for US teachers   a series of films available for US teachers to download, however, it might be with an email to see if you can use this free resource as well. You can download clips of each series from here (AH)
Pixar shorts - DVD from FNAC

-Bounding

imperfect CB
Tele-libre website

or iTiunes podcast from French store

Varied - mainly non-mainstream topics / politics / issues Search for libres courts

Beware -  uncensored

Woof's blog   Lots of youtube links to children programmes collected by a French Dad! (Marie France discovered this gem!) (MFP)
Unifrance website   Site dedicated to promoting le cinéma français (AH)
YouTube Channel HelenMFL Varied YouTube favourites collected by Helen Myers (HEM)
Links / refs to specific films
bonne nuit les petits  for reflexive verbs in the past CB
Coquin calin calin coquin petit ours brun!   CB
L'Epicerie aol version

L'Epicerie Daily Motion version (higher quality)

L'Epicerie YouTube

TV5 Monde teacher notes & transcript

Food & Drink

Shopping

Racism

My students really liked this little short film of a young Arab épicier who pretends not to understand the client who adresses him impolitely. It was on TV5 in the Talents Cannes 2003, but the older films are no longer there. There is however, still on the site, an excellent guide to use with the film . It could be used for the themes of immigration, racism, or even consumerism. (AH)
 film of funny kid!

download worksheet

  Could be used differentiated - sections II and III Could also stop the film just before she chooses who to give the money to for them to suggest what happens next or just before she starts playing the violin to ask what they think she will do with it.(Valérie)
l'ile aux enfants generique     CB
Loulou et les autres loups - search Amazon.fr   As featured in the DVD Dans Paris (EL)
manege enchante lettre au pere noel      CB
linea chameau   

linea velo  

linea cheval  

la linea poissons 

  all linea great for retelling story, writing up what he says, use verbs of movement, present, past

Pupils could narrrate, elicit adjectives of feeling (he is angry, than happy, surprised, etc), make up what he says, etc. (CB)

les coquillages     CB
le noel de petit ours brun   petit ours brun attend noel CB
la révolution des crabes

la révolution des crabes + subtitles

  Story of the tragique destin des crabes: a genetic problem which means they are condemned never to turn ...!!  (Très amusant!  Très philosophe!) (Valérie)
saturnin pompier   The Year 9s had a lesson around the topic of television, so I will show it to them anyway, saying it was my favourite program. I could get them to write some of the dialogues by just watching the characters (all little animals - how can you resist this little duckling with his fireman's helmet climbing the ladder of a toy fire engine??). I might also show it to Year 5 and 7 as we have done animals, and they could guess the story and enjoy watching all the animals without getting tooo much into the language. (CB)
saturnin pompier 2eme partie   (CB)
trotro de mauvaise humeur  (feelings; perfect tense)  (CB)

 

 

German

Title with embedded link Topic Notes
Der Schwarzfahrer without subtitles

 

Der Schwarzfahrer with English subtitles

Ideal for As topics - Integration, generation gap etc. - a classic 9 minute German B/W film set in Berlin.- lots of opportunities when there is no dialogue but plenty of images and expressions to talk about. The unfolding scene on the tram between the young black man and the old lady (and the reactions of the other passengers) is so well done. (AC & SM)

 

Ideas.

 

Ideas: Links

 

Title with embedded link Notes
Audiovisual Bureau of the of French Cultural Services   a document with suggestions and activities using the media in the classroom (AH)
British film institute 70 page downloadable document giving overview on how to use film in education.  see page 26 for MFL. (HEM)
Mise en Scene Cinéma et Lecture ISBN-13: 978-0131839694.

 

Cinema et lecture uniquely motivates students to build and practise their French language skills through the study of film by balancing attention to content, culture, and communication. Using authentic films and readings created for French-speaking audiences, Mise en scene guides students to expand their capacity to use French as they engage independently with these materials and interactively with fellow students and native speakers. The book is not inexpensive but worth it. It is available at Amazon. (AH)
Mise en scène Study Guide  However, there is a companion website that goes with the book. It is the online study guide that goes with the book. For each genre (there are 6) there are three films with vocabulary (there is audio of the vocabulary as well), internet research activities and a reading activity. Having the book is great, but the study guide is so well done that you could use it without the text. (AH)

 

Ideas: Notes

 

Talk from Mark Reid from the BFI - Helen's summary (21/03/08)

Monna, Danièle, Frances and I were there! We were really impressed with Mark Reid's presentation .. he works for the British Film institute and gave a very gentle yet inspiring session on possible techniques for using films in the classroom .... not necessarily the first time I had heard some of the ideas, but somehow by putting them into practice there in the session, I'm feeling inspired to try them out soon! We have asked him to consider doing a Saturday morning session for us some time for one of the Jan/June London ALL events. The difference now as he said is that films are so much more accessible (e.g. by ripping DVDs / capturing streaming .. and BTW he reassured us that as long as DVDs / films had been bought and are being used in the classroom, and not shared, it's OK to rip and use in class ..) and you can do things like mute / separate visuals from audio (rather than as he said having to resort to hanging your jacket over the TV!!). I especially liked his idea about using short films / courts métrages ... having something which is only meant to be,say, 8 mins long being on the whole much more satisfying as part of a lesson than having to break up a long film.(and often in terms of content, more intense cf poetry) Of-course, there needs to be a fair amount of preparation for the class, and this is where we wondered whether we could contribute as an active, collaborative group. 

I wonder whether those who are interested in this on the forum, using this thread could: 

1) Recommend short films / specific sections of longer films (e.g. from sources like the institut . BFI / iTunes / websites etc) 

2) Share ideas for how the films could be exploited (e.g. themes / transcripts of sections / activities for before / during / after viewing (including exploiting language / culture / springboard for creative work) 

 

So, for starters, here's the document to which he referred which gives loads of ideas for exploiting films in general and subject specifically: (page 26 for ML .. this is really about reinforcing cinema literacy ... fits in well with the spirit of 'the new secondary curriculum'! http://www.bfi.org.uk/education/teaching/miic/ and for some short films (libre courts), free on the net / downloadable from the website or iTiunes French store, podcasts: (often to demo new talent .. beware dark humour!) www.latelelibre.fr (then look for the courts métrages) Helen

Use of longs métrages - Marie France (21/03/08)

I often show the longs métrages just for enjoyment , especially for the younger classes. I may do some work after on a theme but I often feel that it would spoil it if they had to fill in lengthy worksheets. Obviously it is different for Year 12 and 13. My Year 9 have really enjoyed Jean de Florettte and Manon des Sources shown this year . I do the same with music. I often play songs in class as they come in. To watch a film or listening to a song in a relaxed atmosphere is often more rewarding as I find that the students are in a better frame of mind and are more receptive. We often discuss things both in French or English.

Contrast subtitled / non-subtitled + recommendations.  Eric Lavigne. (21/03/08)

Just to say that, oddly enough, I did exactly what you'd been thinking of doing with the more satisfactory/satisfying format of a short film as part of a lesson. Inspired by the film suggestions of this MAGNIFICENT forum, I went trawling on amazon.fr to earth up stuff and naturally went for the animation side of things for the younger-ish classes (S1 and S2 here in blustery Scotland). However, without subtitles as standard, the impact - apart from the beauty of the tale, the voices, sounds and music which invariably also provide a DIFFERENT cultural context, it meant having to prepare a synopsis and still break things up. Not having subtitles made it difficult for those with short attention spans and poor language abilities... So the result was still a bit so-so. But that's alright as exposure to anything that rolls back the tide of anglophilia is fine by me... What really worked for me was when I spotted this fabulous children's book by Gregoire Solotareff, entitled LOULOU in a film entitled Dans Paris (itself rather excellent) which we watched at home of an evening. We liked it so much as a device in the film that I ordered it (the book) and was directed to the DVD that goes with it (Loulou et autres loups). Came with subtitles - hooray... As we 'd been doing animals and festivities (Encore Tricolore units 4 and 5 for S1) and food/eating/hobbies (units 8 and 9 for S2) these could be used (if you really wanted to be teacherly about the whole experience), this DVD with 5 animated shorts with wolves as a starting point (the longest of which is the LOULOU) is absolutely BRILLIANT! At ay rate the animation styles are SO different to the usual fare that in itself they're interesting - in a way that art for art's sake and culture for culture's sake is education in itself. If you don't offer it to them there's a great likelihood that they'll never get it. And we'll all be the poorer for it in the end. I really recommend both the books (for circulating amongst your pupils) and the DVD - you'll have fun! Have a lovely Easter weekend! As they've been writing on their Joyeuses Paques cards: Je te/vous souhaite beaucoup de chocolat! (unless you're diabetic in which case that would be both unfortunate and cruel...) Grosses bises feriees! (apologies, no accents available) Eric

Example of exploiting short film - visual impact more important than dialogue (Helen Myers) 21/03/08

That's really helpful Eric. As a result of your email I have thought more about using film, investigated buying Loulou, and found my DVD of Dans Paris which is still 'sous blister / cello' .. will watch tonight! This is a wonderful forum! I'm going to set up a page on the ALL London website for collecting people's ideas in a systematic way if that's OK with people .. What I particularly liked about Mark's presentation was that he was 'exploring' ideas, rather than 'telling' us what we should be doing, and I'm sure that our experiences could help to put together some sort of checklist about what REALLY works, or one which warns people about what to expect. So perhaps drawing attention to the distinction between how you may use films according to 'types' e.g. (a) with subtitles - dialogue strong (b) without subtitles - dialogue not important .... etc etc ... would be useful. So .. for the example Mark showed us .... Type of film: No subtitles: dialogue NOT essential for understanding the film (i.e. visual e.g. comedy / horror) Objectives: (1) use language to predict character, setting, story, mood; (i.e. exploiting the language you can use 'around' the film) (2) observe cultural similarities / differences in what you see in the film (3) increase (film) literacy (4) engage the students SEQUENCE * listen to the audio of the first short scenes * Pairs / groups discuss one of four elements (drawing on their existing experience / literacy]: discuss/ predict each of character / setting / story / mood - [nb the four categories presented as a grid to avoid hierarchy] then plenary feedback * listen to the second short scene and do same * look at four opening still shots from the first four scenes - pupil predict which one in the first one * play the scene * look at four opening still shots from the first four scenes - pupil predict which one in the second one (and say why) * play the scene etc In fact, the film he used could be understood 'visually' without understanding any French .. but since it was a French fim, there were French 'background' noises and French text displayed. I hesitate from telling you what the film is in case Mark wants to use it in his talk to us in January, (it was a superb example!) ..but I think it will probably 'emerge'... and if we carry on this thread an come up with lots of examples, he can use them! Perhaps not giving too much away to say that the strength of the film was that it was all visual and cleverly had a black humour 'twist' at the end which countered your expectations of what type of film it was going to be! 2) Re: Loulou et les loups .. I did a search and will do what you have recommended Eric! Found this site too .. reminded me of the vulture centre I visited in the Dordogne last summer which aimed to reverse the bad press vultures get!!! (and succeeded in doing en ce qui me concerne .. now I have a vautour en peluche hanging in our back room!) http://www.loup.org/spip/Loulou-et-autres-loups,170.html The DVD is available from Amazon fr ... but it doesn't say it has subtitles .. did you get it from the UK site (I tried, but couldn't find a reference to the DVD on the UK site ...) Amazon Fr:  Helen

Ideas for films & activities from Cathy B

I bought the Pixar Shorts in France and they are in French and in English. I have done a lesson on "Bounding" (the one with the lamb who loves dancing) as it uses the imperfect a lot. The year 9s loved it. Let me know if you want it. You can get hold of the DVD on the FNAC website.

Also, I spent loads of time on youtube (becoming a favourite pastime at the weekend), found my favourite kid programme from when I was little - Saturnin. The Year 9s had a lesson around the topic of television, so I will show it to them anyway, saying it was my favourite program. I could get them to write some of the dialogues by just watching the characters (all little animals - how can you resist this little duckling with his fireman's helmet climbing the ladder of a toy fire engine??). I might also show it to Year 5 and 7 as we have done animals, and they could guess the story and enjoy watching all the animals without getting tooo much into the language.

Once you have that on youtube, it'll also give you links to Bonne nuit les petits. Another great short for all languages is Linea. Pupils could narrrate, elicit adjectives of feeling (he is angry, than happy, surprised, etc), make up what he says, etc.

First, a link from Espace Francophone from Louisiana. This is a link to a document from the Audiovisual Bureau of the of French Cultural Services with suggestions and activities using the media in the classroom http://www.espacefrancophone.org/files/TEACHEX7.doc They also have video clips with study guides http://www.espacefrancophone.org/en/audiovisuel/fiche.htm There is also a series of films available for US teachers to download, however, it might be with an email to see if you can use this free resource as well. You can download clips of each series from here http://www.espacefrancophone.org/en/audiovisuel/telechargement.htm I purchased Mise en Scene Cinéma et Lecture to use with my advanced students. ISBN-13: 978-0131839694. Mise en scene: Cinema et lecture uniquely motivates students to build and practice their French language skills through the study of film by balancing attention to content, culture, and communication. Using authentic films and readings created for French-speaking audiences, Mise en scene guides students to expand their capacity to use French as they engage independently with these materials and interactively with fellow students and native speakers. The book is not inexpensive but worth it. It is available at Amazon. However, there is a companion website that goes with the book. It is the online study guide that goes with the book. For each genre (there are 6) there are three films with vocabulary (there is audio of the vocabulary as well), internet research activities and a reading activity. Having the book is great, but the study guide is so well done that you could use it without the text. Here is the link. http://wps.prenhall.com/wl_krueger_mise_1/43/11083/2837350.cw/index.html Finally, Allociné http://www.allocine.fr is great for the film trailers and for the film critiques. I 've always had my advanced students to write film critiques but this year I had them to actually post them to the Allociné site. Not surprisingly, posting these critiques to Allociné produced a much higher quality of work than just a simple paper and pencil exercise. We did, however, do all of our drafting and editing in class. Mille fois merci, Helen for making this resource available! Andrea Henderson http://mmehenderson.typepad.com/

[re: use of YouTube comments] I have successfully used the German viewers' comments below the film - you can select a cross-section of responses for discussion and diamond ranking exercise. alan